At last, North of the Mason-Dixon!

It’s been awhile since I updated! I would love to tell you that after leaving Daleville we suddenly became energized and motivated to pick up the pace, and hiked ourselves 300 miles upward, but alas, that was not the case.
It took us awhile to get up enough energy to pack up our things from the motel in Daleville and hike low miles out of town. On the second day, Shane wasn’t feeling very well, so we made the decision to road walk on the Blue Ridge Parkway for the day, since it would be a smoother, more gradual incline than the steep trail in this section. The BRP runs more or less parallel to the AT for awhile in Virginia, plus has more views than the trail, which only crosses the road occasionally at a few lookout points. 

  
We had planned to road walk for about 15 miles, but after only three, Shane felt too weak to continue. Luckily we were already on a road, so we stuck our thumbs out and the first truck that passed pulled over to pick us up. It was a sweet older man, who volunteered to drive us back in the opposite direction he had been driving because he was retired from the railroad and “not in a hurry to get anywhere anymore.” He took us to a clinic and even offered to wait for us while Shane had his appointment, but we insisted he go back home, and of course, he wouldn’t accept any money from us for his trouble. Once again, a prime example of a good samaritan willing to assist some struggling hikers!
The doctor couldn’t find anything wrong with Shane, so we decided to let him rest for another day and head back out. The clinic was in Buchanan, which only had one motel, and it was booked for the busy Fourth of July Weekend. We asked around for the nearest lodging, and, much to our dismay, discovered that the closest hotels were in…Daleville. So, like in Groundhog Day, we returned to the vortex that we had escaped just two days before.
A few days later… We got a ride from Homer, a shuttle driver and former thru-hiker from 2002 who hiked with his whole family, including two children, who impressively completed the AT at the ages of 8 and 11 years old! Back on the parkway, we hiked for a few miles and came upon the Peaks of Otter, which is a park-type area surrounding three mountains, with campgrounds, hiking trails, a visitor center, and a lodge overlooking a lake. It was a very scenic detour, which required us to stop for lunch at the lodge, and eventually to stay the night, even though it was pricey compared to our usual digs.

 

The view from our room at the Peaks of Otter Lodge. We didn’t see any otters.

  
 It was at this time that we faced the ultimate conversation we had been avoiding for so long: we most certainly had a bad case of the Virginia Blues. We had read in recent previous shelter logs that many hikers were abandoning the trail because of this dreaded disease. Virginia is state with the longest trail section at over 500 miles, and it seems to drag on forever, creating an illusion that you’re not really making progress. We had been in this state for six weeks and we still had 200 miles of it left! Granted, we had been here for so long mostly because we couldn’t seem to drag ourselves out of the motels once we got into them.
It was hot and humid, we were hiking smaller miles than usual, and we were feeling very unmotivated to go on. Shane had been twisting his ankle on a regular basis, and was usually hiking in pain despite our many days off in town. We thought a change of pace might help. So, we hiked a few more days to Glasgow, VA, where Travis’s dad picked us up and drove us back to his house in Maryland. We said goodbye to Virginia- at least for now-and skipped forward over 200 miles to begin again at Harper’s Ferry, WV.

 

The James River Foot Bridge, the longest pedestrian-only bridge on the entire trail

  

It’s a hiker tradition to jump off of the bridge into the James River, but it was about to storm and we didn’t particularly feel like becoming lightning rods, so we decided not to jump.

   

Glasgow had a lovely free shelter for hikers, complete with an outdoor shower!

 

 

Glasgow also has a dinosaur…not sure why, but I’m not complaining.

 
 It was so nice of Travis’s family to let three smelly hikers take over their home for a few days! They fed us real food and we got to do our laundry over and over again (without having to put quarters in) until it no longer reeked of sweat and grime. We made yet another trip to REI, this time to switch out my brand new trail runners for boots again, since my feet had been aching for the last few days, as though the entire bottoms were bruised. It turns out trail runners really aren’t meant for backpacking with heavy packs, which I didn’t know. 

 

Yay food! Yay comfy beds! Yay DeFraites family! And look, you can see their faces now that they shaved off their four-month old beards!

 
Travis’s mom helped us slack pack from Harper’s Ferry to Pennsylvania, allowing us to cover the entire state of Maryland (over 40 miles) in just two days. We visited the Appalachian Trail Conservancy Headquarters in Harper’s Ferry and enjoyed the scenic trip through the historic section of town, which followed an old canal tow path for a few miles parallel to the Potomac River before crossing the border into Maryland. We stopped for lunch at Gathland State Park, which is the former estate of Civil War correspondent George Alfred Townsend.

 

The War Correspondents Memorial at Gathland State Park

 
We began our second day of slack packing at the original Washington Monument, which was not exactly photogenic due to a lightning strike a few weeks ago that cause structural damage. Unfortunately, we were not able to go up into it, since it needed repairs. We ended the day at Pen Mar Park, making it our longest day yet at 22 miles.

 

Washington Monument looking sad with orange cones

 
 

Finally made it out of the South!

 
  
Back out on the trail with our packs, we passed the marker for the 2015 midpoint, at 1094.6 miles. Even though this was not our midpoint since we skipped ahead, it still felt like a milestone. Just after the sign, we saw our first rattlesnake, who loudly announced his presence and meandered slowly across the trail while we stepped as far out of the way as possible. 

 

Here’s the halfway point sign, in all its glory.

  
 
We continued on the next morning to Pine Grove Furnace State Park, where the Ironmaster’s Mansion Hostel provided us with porch space to dry out our packs after hiking for several hours in pouring rain. We checked out the Appalachian Trail Museum and visited the park’s general store, which home to the Half Gallon Challenge, where many hikers attempt to eat a half gallon of ice cream to celebrate passing the halfway point of the trail. We did not participate, since a bucket of ice cream didn’t sound too welcoming at 9:00 am when we were soaking wet from the rain. We did, however, get a hot meal instead, and then the sun came out and it turned out to be a nice (very hot) day after all. We passed Fuller Lake and took a side trail to a view at Pole Steeple, where we talked to lots of curious day hikers about our trip. It felt nice to take our time and enjoy the park.

 

Ironmaster’s Mansion

  

Pine Grove Furnace

    

Pole Steeple Lookout


 …Which brings me to my final update of this post. We have done the math, and we would need to complete more than fifteen miles every day, not including any days off, in order to get to Katahdin by the end of September, which is when we would have to be done in order to have time to go back to the section we skipped in Virginia (Plus, we don’t have enough money to take any more time). It may be possible, but we have been moving slowly lately due to the heat/humidity and Shane’s ongoing ankle issues, and it doesn’t feel right to try to hurry just to get to the end. After all, the whole point of the AT is the journey, not the destination. 
My main goal for hiking was to see new things and travel to new places, which is exactly what we’re doing. Some of my favorite stops on this trip have been parts that weren’t technically on the AT, such as the blue blazed trails to side views and stopping in the parks along the way to learn about the historical significance of the areas through which the trail passes. If we hurry to keep up the pace, these are the moments which will have to be forgone in order to finish on time, and to me those are sacrifices not worth making. If lingering to take in the mountains a little longer means postponing the long-awaited completion of the trail for us, then I am willing to wait a little longer. We are having fun spending time together and being on an adventure, and while it is a bit disappointing to have Katahdin a little farther out of reach, it also feels as though a weight has been lifted off of our shoulders. We no longer feel the pressure from ourselves to finish this year, although we still have plans to complete it eventually. 
We are not quitting, but rather prolonging our hike. Our new goal is to reach the 1,500 mile mark, which will put us approximately on the border between Connecticut and Massachusetts, and then we will return to Virginia to do the section we skipped. Hopefully next year we’ll be able to come back out to finish the remaining 700-ish miles (some hikers call this a “thru in two” hike).
For now, we are looking forward to having my family visit this week and to reach our 1,000 mile mark soon! It’s been a great adventure, and it’s not over yet!

 

Our current location, beautiful Boiling Springs, PA.

  

And, just for fun, this little guy who was chirping under a log at our last campsite. 🐸

 

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2 thoughts on “At last, North of the Mason-Dixon!

  1. Jay says:

    Congratulations on putting new your goals in the right order. Hopefully all recovery is smooth and the joy returns in full measure. I look forward to seeing you guys next week!!

    Like

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